CULTURE

Adjoa J. Burrowes at Virginia Moca

Adjoa J. Burrows Monotype, “Run Down and Run Over”  at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art in Virginia Beach

Adjoa J. Burrowes’s work, “Run Down and Run Over” was selected for the  juried group exhibition “Made In Virginia 2022” at the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art where she won second prize for Best in Show. She was also asked to contribute tools and process materials to the museum’s educational Art Lab. Congratulations to Adjoa and to all the participating artists from the state of Virginia!

  • Adjoa J. Burrowes, Run Down and Run Over at Virginia Moca
  • Adjoa J. Burrowes, Run Down and Run Over at Virginia Moca
  • Adjoa J. Burrowes, Run Down and Run Over at Virginia Moca

Installations shots by Echard Wheeler, Courtesy of Virginia Moca 

Adjoa J. Burrowes at Virginia Moca2022-11-28T23:24:50+00:00

Seeing Slowly

In the US, Labor Day signals that summer is over!

Announcements for art gatherings, openings and lectures are streaming into my email box and onto my social media feeds.

Before the art season starts again, I’d like to share an experience that jarred me.

It’s about social media.

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy Instagram. I post about art and artists.

Recently,  I realized the need to slow down and return to the reason that I find art an essential part of my experience.  I was looking at a large “coffee table” size art book of works on paper by the artist,  Do Ho Suh. I stopped myself suddenly because I realized that I was flipping through the pages as if I was randomly scrolling through Instagram. I was scanning not seeing.

After multiple sessions of scanning the book, I had become aware. I slowed down. I began to experience his drawings and prints.  The  work began to reveal itself. It was an intense experience.

How do you look at art – both in person and online? How have social media platforms impacted the way you look and see?

During conversations about social media, I often advocate for social media as “Marketing” with a capital M. That’s it!

Until recently I had not considered its subtle but real impact on the way that I look and see.

For lessons in slowing down, I recommend a valuable book in my art book collection entitled “Seeing Slowly: Looking at Modern Art” by Michael Findlay. You may  know his book “The Value of Art”.  If you are new to the art, I recommend reading “Seeing Slowly: Looking at Modern Art” first before going on to “The Value of Art”.  Both are well written but “Seeing Slowly” is more personal.

Check it out!


Bibliography 

Seeing Slowly: Looking at Modern Art
Michael Findlay
Prestel, 2017
ISBN: 9783791383835

Seeing Slowly - 9 - 6 - 2022
Seeing Slowly2022-09-07T16:48:38+00:00

Before, During, After: Art Shaping Resilience

Dates: February 14th – March 22, 2021

Angie Newman Johnson Gallery
Episcopal High School
3900 West Braddock Road
Alexandria, VA 22302

For appointments contact Michael Windsor at maw@episcopalhighschool. org

Before, During, After: Art Shaping Resilience showcases the work of nine contemporary visual artists who communicate through art their personal experience of a world that has been altered by concurrent global challenges.

A key objective of this exhibit is to explore how the art object can shape and strengthen resilience. These nine artists create work that communicate universally shared feelings of loss, fear, and illness but also of cultural identity, renewal, and hope. We contend that the creative act itself strengthens an artist’s ability to comeback from difficulties but also that their work can shape resilience in the viewer.

The artists exhibiting in Before, During, After are Adjoa J Burrowes, Gail Shaw-Clemons, Alonzo Davis, Joan Dreyer, Mary Welch Higgins, Sarah J Hull, Akemi Maegawa, Alexandra N Sherman, Elizabeth Vorlicek.

Curated by Mary Welch Higgins

 

Before, During, After: Art Shaping Resilience2022-02-16T20:42:21+00:00
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